Autumn in the Lake District

What a stunning place, especially in the Autumn, and even under the flat grey sky that you see in the UK so often.

I’m spending a long weekend in the Lakes District in late October. It’s always hard to tell when the autumn colours are going to be at their peak, but they weren’t bad on this weekend.

Our day started with sunrise photos on Lake Windermere. Not very inspiring under grey skies, but if the sun is around, or if there is a bit of mist it can get a bit more interesting. I found it very peaceful looking over the lake.

Lake Windemere
Lake Windemere

From the lake, we headed out to Skelwith Bridge. Just a little way from Skelwith Bridge along the River Brathay, is a lovely old bridge. The river flows through the woods which have turned to lovely yellows and oranges.

Bridge over the River Brathay, Skelwith Bridge
Bridge over the River Brathay, Skelwith Bridge

A favourite area of mine was Rydal. With a lovely old bridge, Rydal Water, the gardens and woods behind Rydal Mount, and then the waterfall, there was plenty of autumn colour. I particularly loved the red Japanese maples.

Rydal Mount
Rydal Mount

Our final stop on the first day was Ambleside, and a visit to Stockghyll Force, just a short walk outside of the town centre. The walk takes you through the woods, which were turning yellow, following the River Rothay until you reach the falls.

Stockghyll Force
Stockghyll Force, near Ambleside

On the second day, we went for a sunrise shoot to Blea Tarn, a lovely little lake with views to Langdale Pike. On a sunny still morning it would be absolutely stunning, with the sun lighting up the mountain. Even on a grey day in autumn I could appreciate its wild beauty.

Still in the Little Langdale area is my favourite bridge, Slater Bridge. Made of slate, this ancient pedestrian bridge crossing the River Brathay was built to connect the village of Little Langdale to the nearby slate quarries. Nowadays, it is popular with hikers.

Slater Bridge, Little Langdale
Slater Bridge, Little Langdale

No trip to the Lake District is complete without a trip to the northern part of the region, to Keswick and the Derwent Water.

Derwent Water
Derwent Water

There is still so much of the area to explore.

Logistics:

Our reference for the weekend was ‘The Photographer’s Guide to The Lake District’ by E. Bowness. This fantastic book contains details of all the top spots, how to get there, where to park, best time of day as well as some inspirational photos.

We based ourselves in Windermere in the southern part of the Lakes District.

For sunrise and sunset photos you definitely need a car to get around. There is a good bus service available to many of the towns especially if you base yourself in Windermere or Ambleside.

Windermere is an easy 3 ½ hours by train from London, and there are good deals if you can book in advance.

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